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Wednesday, February 24, 2016

The Patriots Daily Bites of American History Series 9 :The beginning of the War:

THE COUNTRY


THE PATRIOT

THE HISTORY




PEARL LEONA STURGIS·FRIDAY, Febuary 19, 2016


The Patriots Daily Bites of American History Series # 9
US History teacher Gregory Dixon 1956 The beginning of the War:
The British Expedition to Lexington and Concord:
The Battle:
 The Retreat:


General Gage, the British General, having learned that the colonists had stored a quantity of gunpowder and provisions at Concord, about a mile from Boston for the use of their military, sent a secret expedition to destroy both the gun powder and provisions. Tyrants know that the only way to put down this resistance is to first disarm the people so this was a very important move in the destruction of the right of the colonists. The British soldiers were instructed to go by the way of Lexington and there arrest Samuel Adams and John Hancock who were there to be visiting Pastor Jonas Clark. The London newspapers boasted that the heads of these prominent rebels would soon be on exhibition in their city. 

The British General Gage soon learned that Adams and Hancock were not the type to lose their heads so easily. The British troops left Boston on April 18,1775 just before midnight. Paul Revere, a noted Boston patriot was on the watch. At his request two signal lanterns flashed the news abroad from the steeple of the Old North Church and he gallopped through the country giving the alarm. When he reached the house in Lexington where Hancock and Adams were asleep the man on guard cried out to him not to make so much noise. “Noise?” shouted Paul Revere! “You will have noise The British are coming!” 


When the news came to Adams and Hancock that the British are coming they asked the man they were staying with, Reverend Jonas Clark, if his men were ready to fight. Pastor Clark answered, “I have trained them for this very day!” Just before daybreak the British marched into the village Green of Lexington where a number of “minute men” had gathered. “Disperse ye rebels!” shouted the British Commander. No one moved. Nobody knows who fired the first shot but British shots blazed out and seven americans fell dead. Some scattering shots were fired in return. Advancing to Concord the British destroyed such military stored that they could find.

 At Concord Bridge they were met by the Patriots. It was the opening battle of the Revolution and several men fell from each side. At Concord Bridge the first British soldiers were killed. The first British graves were dug. The british then drew back leaving the Americans in possession of the bridge and marched toward Boston. The whole country was aroused. The farmers fired at the British behind every wall, bush and tree. The minute men chased them all the way to Charlestown. Nearly 300 of “The Red Coats” (nick name for the British soldiers) lay dead of dying on the road. The next morning the British Army found themselves shut up in Boston. Americans had them surrounded and dared them to come out and fight. The siege at Boston had begun. 

(to be continued)
The War Begins:



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